Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

‘Clear and present danger’ – glyphosate resistance in the North

Researchers and growers have long been anticipating glyphosate resistance in the Northern cropping region and now the preliminary results from the first herbicide resistance survey in the region are confirming the ‘clear and present danger’ facing the grains industry. While growers have previously enjoyed the ‘freedom’ to use this herbicide as their go-to, highly effective tool for weed control, there’s now strong evidence that they should look for ways to protect this mode of action and implement a variety of tools such as the double knock, rotating herbicides and seed bank management as a matter of urgency.   

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Alphabet cross-resistance in South Australia

Alarming herbicide resistance news has come out of South Australia. A population of ryegrass from the Eyre Peninsula, SA has been confirmed resistant to all of the pre-emergent herbicides – Avadex, Arcade, Trifluralin, Propyzamide and Sakura, as well as two lesser-known herbicides. It was sampled in 2014 just two years after the release of Sakura in Australia. You guessed it, metabolic cross-resistance is at play. What’s most concerning is a random survey in the South East of SA found many more populations of ryegrass with multiple cross-resistance to a range of pre-emergent herbicides. The perplexing thing is that there’s no predictable…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chaff lining…too good to be true?

How often do we hear comments like “you get what you pay for” or “it’s too good to be true”? Well, chaff lining just may be the exception to those comments. Chaff lining has been on a rapid rise to glory in the Harvest Weed Seed Control (HWSC) scene over the past two seasons. A survey of WeedSmart subscribers showed the percentage of growers using chaff lining increased from 6% in 2016 to 26% in 2017. So, at $6.40/ha, do you get what you pay for? Is it too good to be true?

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

GST – a tax on herbicide molecules

When you buy a birthday cake, the goods and services tax (GST) makes the cost of the cake bigger.  If only Mr Hewson could have explained it so succinctly he may have been Prime Minister! There’s another type of GST in plants that do the same thing to herbicide molecules. It makes them bigger and then the whole thing gets smashed to pieces. The GST in plants are enzymes called glutathione-S-transferase.  In other words, they join or transfer the big molecule glutathione onto other molecules. Click through to learn more!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Digging deep into 2,4-D resistance

Synthetic auxins might be the oldest kids on the herbicide block but that doesn’t mean they are well understood. In fact, there are very large knowledge gaps that researchers like AHRI’s Dr Danica Goggin are trying hard to fill in a bid to find ways to overcome resistance to this herbicide group in weeds such as wild radish.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Spoiled rotten – the sequel

Four years ago, we suggested in AHRI insight that farmers were spoiled for choice with five harvest weed seed control tools to choose from with a sixth in development. Well, a lot has happened since then. We now have seven harvest weed seed control tools to choose from, so if farmers were spoiled for choice in 2014 they are absolutely spoiled rotten now!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

AHRI insight – the 100 is up!

We’re undecided whether we should picture the AHRI communication team cutting through a massive banner as we run onto the ground or raising our bats in the air at the MCG after a long day in the middle. It’s been a long innings and is one that we have enjoyed immensely. To celebrate the 100th AHRI insight we’re reflecting on what have been the big stories that got you excited and made the biggest impact.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chickpeas can compete

There are few herbicide options for sowthistle control in chickpea crops, making the perfect recipe for a good ol’ sowthistle blowout. Despite all of this, the latest research by Michael Widderick, Adam McKiernan and Greg Harvey from QDAF with GRDC investment is finding that chickpeas can win the competition against sowthistle if they stack their deck. Growing a chickpea crop at narrow row spacing and high crop density in northern cropping regions can greatly reduce sowthistle seed production without reducing chickpea yield. Click through to find out more!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What matters more? Crop sequence or seeder?

Can we get away with a single break crop if we throw enough ‘aggressive agronomy’ at a ryegrass population? Are expensive herbicides worth the money?  What is better, disc or tyne? Why were the batsmen tampering with the ball, shouldn’t that be the bowler’s job? These are all questions that were being asked by a local project committee of growers and advisers, and there was only one way to answer them. Enter Tony Swan from CSIRO. He and his team embarked on a massive, long-term research effort in Temora NSW, working with FarmLink to make it happen.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

How trifluralin resistance works

Do you know what a microtubule is? If you could dream up the most complex way to make a tube, microtubules are it! Assembling a microtubule is about as complex as assembling a car, and there are thousands of them in every cell, in every living thing. If you aren’t super interested in the detail, all you need to know is that trifluralin kills plants by binding to microtubules and stopping cell division. AHRI researcher Qin Yu and her team of Chinese PhD students have recently identified the exact mutation in microtubules that stops trifluralin binding to them and causes…

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