Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Digging deep into 2,4-D resistance

Synthetic auxins might be the oldest kids on the herbicide block but that doesn’t mean they are well understood. In fact, there are very large knowledge gaps that researchers like AHRI’s Dr Danica Goggin are trying hard to fill in a bid to find ways to overcome resistance to this herbicide group in weeds such as wild radish.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Spoiled rotten – the sequel

Four years ago, we suggested in AHRI insight that farmers were spoiled for choice with five harvest weed seed control tools to choose from with a sixth in development. Well, a lot has happened since then. We now have seven harvest weed seed control tools to choose from, so if farmers were spoiled for choice in 2014 they are absolutely spoiled rotten now!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

AHRI insight – the 100 is up!

We’re undecided whether we should picture the AHRI communication team cutting through a massive banner as we run onto the ground or raising our bats in the air at the MCG after a long day in the middle. It’s been a long innings and is one that we have enjoyed immensely. To celebrate the 100th AHRI insight we’re reflecting on what have been the big stories that got you excited and made the biggest impact.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chickpeas can compete

There are few herbicide options for sowthistle control in chickpea crops, making the perfect recipe for a good ol’ sowthistle blowout. Despite all of this, the latest research by Michael Widderick, Adam McKiernan and Greg Harvey from QDAF with GRDC investment is finding that chickpeas can win the competition against sowthistle if they stack their deck. Growing a chickpea crop at narrow row spacing and high crop density in northern cropping regions can greatly reduce sowthistle seed production without reducing chickpea yield. Click through to find out more!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What matters more? Crop sequence or seeder?

Can we get away with a single break crop if we throw enough ‘aggressive agronomy’ at a ryegrass population? Are expensive herbicides worth the money?  What is better, disc or tyne? Why were the batsmen tampering with the ball, shouldn’t that be the bowler’s job? These are all questions that were being asked by a local project committee of growers and advisers, and there was only one way to answer them. Enter Tony Swan from CSIRO. He and his team embarked on a massive, long-term research effort in Temora NSW, working with FarmLink to make it happen.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

How trifluralin resistance works

Do you know what a microtubule is? If you could dream up the most complex way to make a tube, microtubules are it! Assembling a microtubule is about as complex as assembling a car, and there are thousands of them in every cell, in every living thing. If you aren’t super interested in the detail, all you need to know is that trifluralin kills plants by binding to microtubules and stopping cell division. AHRI researcher Qin Yu and her team of Chinese PhD students have recently identified the exact mutation in microtubules that stops trifluralin binding to them and causes…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Wild radish random AHRI survey of Western Australia

The most recent AHRI random resistance survey by researcher Mechelle Owen reflects exactly these observations. The survey visited 500 fields in 2015 and found only 65 wild radish populations in crop compared to 96 in the previous survey in 2010. There were fewer populations of wild radish found in the crop in the north, and more populations found throughout the rest of the state. As you may expect, herbicide resistance levels in wild radish have generally increased a little between the 2010 and 2015 surveys. Click through to read more.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Has herbicide resistance in ryegrass in WA plateaued?

“The nice part about being a pessimist is that you are constantly being either proven right or pleasantly surprised.” George Will, American journalist, author and Pulitzer Prize-winner. We are not pessimists at AHRI, but let’s face it, we rarely have good news when it comes to reporting on the level of resistance progression on Australian farms.  We are normally proven right that herbicide resistance levels are continually increasing. The latest results from the AHRI random ryegrass resistance survey of WA led by Dr Mechelle Owen isn’t necessarily good news, but it’s about as good as we could have hoped.  We…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

iHSD – encouraging research despite challenges during 2017 harvest

It would be remiss of us to talk about the latest integrated Harrington Seed Destructor (iHSD) research without acknowledging the challenges with this new machinery during the 2017 harvest. It was frustrating for everyone, but the researchers, manufacturers and suppliers are playing the long game, and they are dedicated to succeeding in the long run. Recent research by Michael Walsh commenced at AHRI and was completed at Sydney University with help from John Broster at Charles Sturt University (CSU), shows that despite the problems that have been experienced with the new machines, iHSD mills are passing the research tests with flying…

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Heping Han

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Glyphosate resistance and plant fitness

Things that affect your fitness: Christmas – go on, have one more serving of trifle, it is only wafer thin! Television – for example, spending five full days watching the Boxing Day test match cricket. Each on their own are not too bad, but put them together and we have a problem. Things that affect plant fitness: The TIPS mutation that causes high-level glyphosate resistance. The TIPS mutation is a double mutation of the glyphosate target site, the 102 and the 106 mutation. The 106 mutation has been found in a number of species and has no fitness penalty associated…

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