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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Harvest weed seed control is now mainstream

Tag Archives | management

narrow windrow burning

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Harvest weed seed control is now mainstream

Australians invented the lawn mower, rotary clothes hoists, plastic bank notes, WiFi, the electric drill, and five of the six harvest weed seed control (HWSC) techniques. And while the Canadians invented the chaff cart (to feed livestock) it was Australian farmers and researchers who started using it for HWSC. So we’re going to claim HWSC as a true blue Aussie invention too! We are the inventors of some of the key tools of HWSC and a recent GRDC grower survey has shown that we are by far the world leaders in the adoption of these practices. Not so long ago…

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stressed weeds

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Why thirsty weeds are hard to kill

Unfortunately, large parts of Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland are as dry as a London newspaper! This edition of AHRI insight looks to address the issue of spraying stressed weeds. We had to go back to 1995 to find some relevant research, but it was worth it. The GRDC funded research conducted by Dave Minkey and John Moore at DAFWA in the 90s is pure gold! In a dry year, we’re often faced with the whole kit and caboodle – moisture stressed weeds, high temperatures, low relative humidity and long durations between rainfall events.

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HSD

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Harvest weed seed control tools – they all work

On November 5th, 2010, a truck arrived at Yuna at the northern tip of the Western Australian wheatbelt. Its cargo was a John Deere 9650 harvester with a tow-behind Harrington Seed Destructor attached. Twenty local farmers had arrived to see the new machine that they’d heard about for so long. And what did he find from two years of this GRDC funded, AHRI supported research? One, solitary number: 60%. That’s not the whole story though…read on for more!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Double breaks – a double shot at annual ryegrass

Short black, long black, double shot, double break? Coffee preference is a little like crop sequences. Perhaps you’re a ‘short black’ wheat-canola type, strong on inputs? Or a ‘long black’ type who likes to dilute their rotations a bit more? When it comes to managing annual ryegrass populations, Tony Swan and the research team from CSIRO Plant Industry and FarmLink, have shown that ‘double shots’ are the key.

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Stubble

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Herbicides and stubble – some wash off, some don’t

Which herbicides wash off wheat stubble? Ask any farmer how hard it is to wash the yellow trifluralin stain out of their clothes and you had better be ready for a tirade of domestic hardship! “I just throw them straight in the bin these days”, commented one irate farmer. “I would sooner try and wash off a tattoo than remove that horrible yellow stuff from my work shirts.” No wonder the urban myth tells us that trifluralin was originally developed as clothes dye. If Yaseen Khalil’s recent research is anything to go by, trifluralin would make a wonderful dye and…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

New boy band – ‘The Feathertop Rhodes’

Feathertop Rhodes (FTR) Grass is the boy band of the weeds world. They pop up quickly from obscurity (first to germinate after rain), stress easily at the first sign of trouble (dry), and can be all done and dusted in 18 months (short seed life), not to mention that they are downright annoying as well! If you think this is just a Queensland problem, think again. This boy band, I mean weed, has risen to fame in recent years as it has spread from its home in Queensland to playing gigs on road verges all over the country. When faced…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chaff carts – good for the crop and the sheep

So often in life, there are things that conflict with one another. Take the Australian cricket team for example. Social media is great for the social lives of the players, but it is disastrous for their batting. You simply can’t bat all day in a test match when you have the attention span of a goldfish! Farming is just the same. There are conflicting farming practices. Often what is good for the crop is detrimental to the sheep, and vice versa. Until now. The humble chaff cart is good for both the crop and the sheep. Ed Riggall is a…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Harvester set-up – catch weed seeds and grain

Roger Lowenstein, in his book about Warren Buffett wrote, “Buffett found it extraordinary that academics studied such things. They studied what was measurable, rather than what was meaningful”. When John Broster from CSU and Michael Walsh from Sydney University set out to measure how many weed seeds were entering the chaff fraction in a modern harvester, they were definitely studying what was meaningful, but man was it difficult to measure! In 2014, John and Michael set up trials with five different harvesters in NSW and found, much to their distain, that all of the harvesters were throwing a lot of…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Mungbeans, you will never guess which row spacing is best!

If you have ever tried to use a Philips head screwdriver on a slotted head screw, or hammer in a nail with the back of a spanner, you know how important it is to have the right tool for the job. Mungbeans are often sown with a planter on 1m row spacing that was designed for cotton, maize or sorghum because this is what the grower has and it is hard to have a different planter for every crop. But is it the right tool for the job? We have previously reported on the benefits of narrow row spacing of…

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