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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Reversing trifluralin resistance

Tag Archives | trifluralin

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Reversing trifluralin resistance

They said it couldn’t be done – climbing Everest, flying to the moon and even deep-frying Mars bars. We were also told that we couldn’t reverse herbicide resistance. In the majority of cases, the experts are right – herbicide resistance is permanent, and we thought that was the case for all resistant weeds. Until now…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What’s the sticking point? Better pre-em efficacy in stubble retention systems

Pre-emergent herbicides are a valuable tool to underpin crop competition and suppress weed seed production in-crop, but when growers also want to harness the power of retained stubble they often run into a sticking point where pre-emergent herbicide efficacy is compromised. Most growers and advisors are aware that products such as trifluralin are quite tightly bound if they contact stubble during application, however, AHRI research associate Dr Yaseen Khalil has been working to shed light on the behaviour of the newer pre-emergent herbicides and how to use them in no-till, stubble retention farming systems. Click through to learn more.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Trifluralin resistance is different – recessive inheritance

We once thought that the genetics of eye colour was simple. Both parents have blue eyes, therefore, all of their children will have blue eyes. Easy peasy! Then science progressed and we realised that it isn’t actually that simple because several genes are involved. The genetics of herbicide resistance was simple. One parent is resistant to a herbicide, therefore, all of the offspring will be resistant because the gene is dominant or semi-dominant. This is true for almost all cases of herbicide resistance and was easy to understand. Until now. Click to read more about PhD student Jinyi Chen’s research.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Pre-emergent herbicides in stubble – strike or foul?

Ever tried walking out onto a 10-pin bowling alley? It’s generally not pretty, often resulting in a rapid and undignified descent to ground level…But that’s just what we need to get pre-emergent herbicides to slide off stubble and into the soil, which can be difficult in higher residue systems. Rainfall is obviously a key driver in leaching herbicides from stubble before they dissipate, but as we all know rain can be an unpredictable beast. Fortunately, research has shown that some pre-emergent herbicides require far less rainfall to move off stubble and into the soil where they can control germinating weeds. 

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Stubble

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Herbicides and stubble – some wash off, some don’t

Which herbicides wash off wheat stubble? Ask any farmer how hard it is to wash the yellow trifluralin stain out of their clothes and you had better be ready for a tirade of domestic hardship! “I just throw them straight in the bin these days”, commented one irate farmer. “I would sooner try and wash off a tattoo than remove that horrible yellow stuff from my work shirts.” No wonder the urban myth tells us that trifluralin was originally developed as clothes dye. If Yaseen Khalil’s recent research is anything to go by, trifluralin would make a wonderful dye and…

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Gayle Somerville, pre-em

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Why do pre-em herbicides last so long before resistance bites?

Once in a while, someone comes along and asks a question that you have never given much consideration to. Like, “Why does beer garden beer taste so bad?” or “Why do hotels always give away piles of stuff except for what you actually need, like a toothbrush or a razor?” and “Why do our pre-emergent herbicides last longer than our post-emergent herbicides before resistance bites”? Sure, we had probably considered this question in the past, but many of us would have just assumed that the gene frequency for resistance to our pre-emergent herbicides was low. However, Gayle Somerville, who recently…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Mini-series: ‘Pre-emergent: A tale of four herbicides’ – Episode 3: ‘Phorate’

  Previously on ‘Pre-emergent: A tale of four herbicides’… In Episode 1, AHRI researcher Roberto Busi turned to the dark side and evolved Sakura resistance in the lab, and then found this had caused cross-resistance to Boxer® and Avadex®, creating the world’s most wanted criminal ryegrass population. In Episode 2, Busi teamed up with Todd Gaines and Martin Vila-Aiub. They found that the world’s most criminal ryegrass could share its resistance trait by passing on just one single gene. Fortunately, they found that this gene was semi-dominant. Now, in Episode 3, Busi is at it again, trying to correct his…

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