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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Are ‘pre-ems and crop competition’ the ‘wine and cheese’ of weed control in canola?

Tag Archives | management

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Are ‘pre-ems and crop competition’ the ‘wine and cheese’ of weed control in canola?

Wine and cheese. Strawberries and cream. Crop competition and pre-emergent herbicides. Ok so the last one doesn’t quite have the same ring about it but they really do go together nicely. Combining a competitive canola variety with pre-emergent herbicides has proven to be an effective strategy for reducing annual ryegrass seed set. Recent trials showed that with effective pre-emergent herbicides, a competitive hybrid canola variety can reduce ryegrass seed set by 50% compared with a less competitive open-pollinated (OP) variety. That’s impressive. But should we tar all OP varieties with the same brush?

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chaff lining…too good to be true?

How often do we hear comments like “you get what you pay for” or “it’s too good to be true”? Well, chaff lining just may be the exception to those comments. Chaff lining has been on a rapid rise to glory in the Harvest Weed Seed Control (HWSC) scene over the past two seasons. A survey of WeedSmart subscribers showed the percentage of growers using chaff lining increased from 6% in 2016 to 26% in 2017. So, at $6.40/ha, do you get what you pay for? Is it too good to be true?

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Spoiled rotten – the sequel

Four years ago, we suggested in AHRI insight that farmers were spoiled for choice with five harvest weed seed control tools to choose from with a sixth in development. Well, a lot has happened since then. We now have seven harvest weed seed control tools to choose from, so if farmers were spoiled for choice in 2014 they are absolutely spoiled rotten now!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

AHRI insight – the 100 is up!

We’re undecided whether we should picture the AHRI communication team cutting through a massive banner as we run onto the ground or raising our bats in the air at the MCG after a long day in the middle. It’s been a long innings and is one that we have enjoyed immensely. To celebrate the 100th AHRI insight we’re reflecting on what have been the big stories that got you excited and made the biggest impact.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Chickpeas can compete

There are few herbicide options for sowthistle control in chickpea crops, making the perfect recipe for a good ol’ sowthistle blowout. Despite all of this, the latest research by Michael Widderick, Adam McKiernan and Greg Harvey from QDAF with GRDC investment is finding that chickpeas can win the competition against sowthistle if they stack their deck. Growing a chickpea crop at narrow row spacing and high crop density in northern cropping regions can greatly reduce sowthistle seed production without reducing chickpea yield. Click through to find out more!

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What matters more? Crop sequence or seeder?

Can we get away with a single break crop if we throw enough ‘aggressive agronomy’ at a ryegrass population? Are expensive herbicides worth the money?  What is better, disc or tyne? Why were the batsmen tampering with the ball, shouldn’t that be the bowler’s job? These are all questions that were being asked by a local project committee of growers and advisers, and there was only one way to answer them. Enter Tony Swan from CSIRO. He and his team embarked on a massive, long-term research effort in Temora NSW, working with FarmLink to make it happen.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

iHSD – encouraging research despite challenges during 2017 harvest

It would be remiss of us to talk about the latest integrated Harrington Seed Destructor (iHSD) research without acknowledging the challenges with this new machinery during the 2017 harvest. It was frustrating for everyone, but the researchers, manufacturers and suppliers are playing the long game, and they are dedicated to succeeding in the long run. Recent research by Michael Walsh commenced at AHRI and was completed at Sydney University with help from John Broster at Charles Sturt University (CSU), shows that despite the problems that have been experienced with the new machines, iHSD mills are passing the research tests with flying…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Sowthistle – know the enemy, exploit its weakness

Going into the 1932-33 Ashes tour in Australia, Don Bradman was averaging around 100, and he had averaged 139 in the 1930 tour of England. He seemed unbeatable. How then, did he go on to only averaging a paltry 56.57 in 1932-33 Ashes? Simple, the English cricket team had discovered his weakness, short, fast, leg side bowling known as bodyline, and they employed this tactic much to the chagrin of the Australian public. ‘It’s just not cricket!’ When we are faced with a new enemy, that is seemingly unbeatable, we need to investigate its weaknesses and then perhaps we can…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

When does a seed become a seed?

When does a fracas become a melee? When does a cake become a soufflé? When does a wild radish seed become a viable seed, after which time spraying with a crop topping herbicide becomes futile? We know that for grass weeds we need to crop top or spray top sometime between flowering and milky dough of the grass seed (depending on the herbicide) to achieve high levels of control, but this timing is not well understood for broadleaf weeds such as wild radish. In the early 2000’s, Dr Aik Cheam from DAFWA did a great job of describing the critical wild…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

How a new wheat variety could compete with weeds like Jonah Lomu did on the field

Jonah Lomu stood at 6’5”, weighed 120kg, and ran the 100m in a lazy 10.7 seconds. He could play the power game, the speed game, and he could step. He was the ultimate competitor. Mace wheat, on the other hand, is agile, dependable, and can play the yield game, but its ability to compete with weeds is limited. However, yield is king, and hence Mace has been an extremely successful variety where weeds are under adequate control. What if we could have a wheat variety that could play the yield game and the competition game? What would that look like?

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