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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Hoe, hoe, hoe and away weeds go!

Tag Archives | management

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Hoe, hoe, hoe and away weeds go!

How many hours did you spend out in the paddock with a chipping hoe when you were a kid? Do you still carry one in every ute? Chances are you know how effective they are; but wouldn’t mind if you never had to use one again! Australia has an unfortunate habit of claiming world-firsts in new species for the herbicide resistance lists. Fortunately, we have also been leaders in the development of new tools to help combat the problem. Enter: the revolutionary new chipping hoe! The latest of these developments is the world’s first site-specific mechanical weeder.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Don’t delay sowing to beat ryegrass

Work up, work back, seed. That was the system. Then along came no-till. Spray a knockdown, seed in one pass. Game changer. Then came a more variable climate and a suite of pre-emergent herbicides that made early and dry seeding possible. And now we have seed early at all costs, dry if necessary, and get the crop up and away on the first rain. But what does this do for weeds? Should we delay sowing and wait for a knockdown, or have we got it right?

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A team of DPIRD researchers, led by Dr Catherine Borger has quantified the impact of five weed species of emerging importance in the WA grains belt.

Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

New-comers causing trouble

How long have you lived where you live? If you’re a long-time local you will have seen new people come and go – some are gone before you get to know them and others stay and find their niche in the community. Weed communities also change over time and it can take some effort to get to know and understand the new-comers. Will they thrive? Do they fit in? Will they disrupt the way things are done? Or will they go away again, almost unnoticed?

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Luximax gets its own NEW box

We all put things in boxes inside our head to help us organise our brain. A few of the important boxes I have inside my head – fishing spots, great moments in sport, top five meals of all time, jokes, song lyrics, useless trivia, movie quotes, WA town license plates, and of course the nothing box (the place every man retreats to when he has five minutes of peace and quiet!). Ok, it’s not an over-achieving brain but it gets me by. However, sometimes something new will come along and it won’t fit into your existing boxes. It might need…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

I can’t live without the Internet!! And I can’t farm without glyphosate.

There are certain things that come along and change the world – electricity, the Internet, mobile phones, and GPS to name just a recent few – and it’s very hard to imagine going back to living without them, even though people did for millennia. For farmers, conservation cropping changed the world – saving soil, water and bank balances along the way – and it is unthinkable to go back to full cultivation for weed control. Click through to learn more.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What’s the sticking point? Better pre-em efficacy in stubble retention systems

Pre-emergent herbicides are a valuable tool to underpin crop competition and suppress weed seed production in-crop, but when growers also want to harness the power of retained stubble they often run into a sticking point where pre-emergent herbicide efficacy is compromised. Most growers and advisors are aware that products such as trifluralin are quite tightly bound if they contact stubble during application, however, AHRI research associate Dr Yaseen Khalil has been working to shed light on the behaviour of the newer pre-emergent herbicides and how to use them in no-till, stubble retention farming systems. Click through to learn more.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Mixing herbicides wins again

What sort of person goes to a cocktail party and sticks strictly to beer? A smart one! We all know that mixing drinks can hurt the next day. We can’t say the same for herbicide mixing though. The smart farmers and agronomists are mixing two or more herbicides targeting the same resistant weed to delay resistance and maximise weed control, and the science is supporting this approach. AHRI researcher Roberto Busi is a long-term advocate of herbicide mixing and in his recent paper which describes some computer modelling that he undertook with the help of Michael Renton.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Trending now: herbicide resistance management

‘Trending now’ seems to be everywhere – iTunes, Twitter, the news, so why not herbicide resistance? What have been the #Top5 trends in resistance management over the past decade? As a young agronomist 20-something years ago (clearly before trending was a thing), I remember learning about the threat of herbicide resistance as if it was a kind of apocalypse. Some growers were genuinely concerned that they wouldn’t be able to continue farming. We’ve come a long way in a relatively short time. In this insight, we look closely at what’s trending in the herbicide resistance management space.

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

What’s the cost of harvest weed seed control for YOU?

The ad in the paper that reads “Horse, free to a good home” seems to be a good deal at first, but what is the true cost of owning a horse? Roughly similar to running a Lamborghini as I understand! The ‘do it yourself’ narrow windrow burning chute seems cheap at the time, but what is the true cost? It depends…

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Australian Herbicide Resistance Initiative (AHRI)

Crops are doin’ it for themselves

We answer a few poignant questions in this insight, including: ‘Can crops do more of the heavy lifting when it comes to weed control than modern farming methods have allowed them?’ or ‘Have we tried so hard to protect crops from weeds that we have forgotten that they have innate mechanisms to ‘stand on their own two feet’ and ‘do it for themselves’?’ A series of important studies into the practical implications of harnessing the crop’s ability to defend itself against weeds are starting to produce important results, leading to improvements in farming practice and the development of new cultivars.

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